How to report fraud - Global Singapore Visa processing tips

How do I report immigration fraud?

Call the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) Border Watch Toll-Free Line at 1-888-502-9060 to report:

• suspicious border activity,
• a marriage of convenience,
• a person who has given false information on any immigration application or
• a person wanted on an immigration warrant.

What you tell the tip line is private.

How do I report citizenship fraud?

You can report a person who:

• pretended to live in Canada to become a citizen or
• hid information about their case.

In Canada, you may contact the Call Centre and choose the citizenship fraud tip option in our automated telephone system.

Outside Canada, contact your nearest Canadian visa office.

You can also email tips to Citizenship-fraud-tips@cic.gc.ca.

How do I report Internet, E-mail or Telephone scams and fraud?

If you or someone you know may have been the target of a telephone, internet, email or other type of scam and unwittingly provided personal or financial information you should:

In Canada, contact the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

Toll-free: 1-888-495-8501
Toll-free fax: 1-888-654-9426

Outside Canada, report the scam to your local police.

How do I report a possible victim of human trafficking?

If you or someone you know is a victim, contact your local police.

To report a crime without saying who you are, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). Do not take the law into your own hands or take part in any illegal activity.
Date: 2016.06.09 Category: Tips Comments (0) Trackbacks (0)

Avoid Online Holiday Booking Scams by Bacall Associates

How to avoid online holiday booking scams

The post-Christmas rush for holiday bookings is in full swing, as are reports of fraudulent travel companies operating online. Do you know what to look out for to avoid being scammed?

The growth of holidays and flights available on the internet has provided a wealth of opportunities for the travelling public but it has also provided opportunities for fraudsters. At the start of each New Year fraudsters steal millions of pounds targeting holidaymakers who book their summer holidays online.

HOLIDAY BOOKING FRAUD

The criminals scam unsuspecting members of the public by posing as online travel agents and setting up fake travel booking websites. They can make large sums of money by taking payments for holiday, hotel and flight reservations that do not exist. This is common for bookings related to high profile events as well as holidays.

As a result, individual consumers are losing up to tens of thousands of pounds on phone bookings. They often do not discover they have been ripped off until it is too late and are unable to afford a replacement holiday. This has an impact on the health of the victims, as well as on their purses, due to added stress and worry.

The Association of British Travel Agents (ABTA) has seen an increase in customer inquiries relating to fraud during January, the most popular month for consumers to search for cheap holiday bookings. In response, the associatio has released a helpful guide to the warning signs of fraud online.

1. Prices that is considerably lower than competitors

Although prices may vary slightly amongst different agents, flight and holiday prices are largely set and it is unlikely that one is drastically cheaper and genuine.

2. Low resolution and blurry logos for trade associations and credit card companies

If you are unsure, check with the protection organization or trade body that the company is still licensed to trade.

3. The only payment option is a bank transfer

This indicates that no bank is prepared to provide credit card facilities, but paying by credit card will protect your money.

4. Non-receipt of tickets

Always check the paperwork and be wary of companies that don't give any.

5. Check customer reviews and the website address

If a company is defrauding people, there is a good chance that consumers will post details of their experiences and warnings about the company online. An illegitimate website can be spotted by a slight change in the website domain.

Above all, always use your instincts. The sad truth is that if something seems too good to be true, it probably is. So the next time you want to book an exciting getaway online, take on board ABTA's warning signs to escape the scammers.
Date: 2016.05.01 Category: Travel Comments (0) Trackbacks (0)

Are You a Victim of Investment Fraud? How to Get Your Money Back

NEW YORK (MainStreet) — Investing is hard enough without walking into a bear trap set by an unscrupulous fraudster. Crooks create false account statements, make wild performance claims and operate elaborate Ponzi schemes in order to get money out of your pocket and into theirs. If you're the victim of such a crime, what are your chances of getting your money back?

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) recently issued an investor bulletin explaining the ways in which conned consumers can attempt to recover assets lost to criminal investment scams. The good news: there are a number of ways to recover your money. The bad news: you are likely to recover only a portion of your loss – and be prepared for a lengthy process.

"Not all harmed investors will be able to recover money, and many of those who recover money receive less, often substantially less, than their losses from the securities fraud," the SEC says. "In addition, even when harmed investors are able to recover money, the process for distributing the money to harmed investors may take a long time."

If an SEC investigation into securities fraud is successful, enforcement action is initiated through the court system or by an agency administrative proceeding. In addition to attempting to reclaim the proceeds from the fraud on behalf of victims, often penalties and interest are charged; the court or the SEC will determine the distribution of these assets. In other cases, a receivership is formed to recover and manage the proceeds of criminal collections. In fiscal year 2013, the SEC collected more than $1.6 billion in fines and recovered investment assets.

When a brokerage firm fails, investors' assets are covered by the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC). Securities held at the broker-dealer are protected up to $500,000; cash is protected up to $250,000, but only for the value held – assets are not protected from market loss. And this protection is only offered for customers of firms who are members of the SIPC.

Investors who have suffered losses from fraud may also find recourse under federal bankruptcy laws or private class-action lawsuits.

The SEC conducts hundreds of investigations each year and says many violations pertain to the misrepresentation of investments, price manipulation, theft, insider trading or the sale of unregistered securities. A substantial number of these actions are spurred by tips from the public, consumer complaints and whistleblowers. Recent scams have targeted seniors, involved oil and gas companies, gold mining investments and speculative startup companies. Often investors are lured into such schemes on the heels of major news events, including rackets based on the recent Ebola outbreak.
Date: 2015.02.06 Category: Finance Comments (0) Trackbacks (0)

Experts close to perfect in determining truth in interrogations using active question methods

From the International Communication Association media release:

Determining deception is a tool of the trade for law enforcement.

The Good Cop/Bad Cop routine is etched in our minds as an effective method of finding out the truth. But prior research has shown that lie detecting is a 50/50 shot for experts and non-experts alike. So what exactly can we do to find out the truth?

A recent study published in Human Communication Research by researchers at Korea University, Michigan State University, and Texas State University, San Marcos found that using active questioning of individuals yielded near-perfect results, 97.8%, in detecting deception.

Timothy Levine, Hee Sun Park (University of Korea), David Daniel Clare, Steve McCornack, Kelly Morrison (Michigan State University), and J.Pete Blair (Texas State, San Marcos) published their findings in the journal Human Communication Research. The researchers conducted three studies based on sets of participants who were asked to play a trivia game. Unbeknownst to the participants, a confederate was placed with them offering an incentive and opportunity to cheat at the game, since cash prizes were involved. In the first experiment 12% of the subjects cheated; in the second experiment 44.9% cheated.

An expert using the Reid Technique interrogated participants in the first study, this expert was 100% accurate (33 of 33) in determining who had cheated and who had not. That kind of accuracy has 100 million to one odds. The second group of participants were then interviewed by five US federal agents with substantial polygraph and interrogation expertise. Using a more flexible and free approach (interviews lasted from three minutes to 17 minutes), these experts were able to accurately detect whether or not a participant cheated in 87 of 89 interviews (97.8%). In the third study, non-experts were shown taped interrogations of the experts from the previous two experiments. These non-experts were able to determine deception at a greater-than-chance rate – 79.1% (experiment 1), and 93.6% (experiment 2).

Previous studies with "experts" usually used passive deception detection where they watched videotapes. In the few studies where experts were allowed to question potential liars, either they had to follow questions scripted by researchers (this study had no scripts) or confession seeking was precluded. Previous studies found that accuracy was near chance -- just above 50%.

"This research suggests that effective questioning is critical to deception detection," Levine said. "Asking bad questions can actually make people worse than chance at lie detection, and you can make honest people appear guilty. But, fairly minor changes in the questions can really improve accuracy, even in brief interviews. This has huge implications for intelligence and law enforcement."

Levine's findings have led him to develop a new theory, Truth Default Theory. Levine's idea is that when humans communicate with other humans, they tend to operate on a default presumption that what the other person says is basically honest.

"The presumption of honesty is highly adaptive. It enables efficient communication, and this presumption of honesty makes sense because most communication is honest most of the time. However, the presumption of honesty makes humans vulnerable to occasional deceit" Levine said. "There are, of course, times and situations when people abandon this presumption of honesty, and the theory describes when people are expected to suspect a lie or conclude that a lies was told, and the conditions under which people make truth and lie judgments correctly and incorrectly."

"Expertise in Deception Detection Involves Actively Prompting Diagnostic Information Rather Than Passive Behavioral Observation," by Timothy Roland Levine, David Daniel Clare, J. Pete Blair, Steve McCornack, Kelly Morrison and Hee Sun Park; Human Communication Research


Date: 2014.09.09 Category: Health Comments (0) Trackbacks (0)