Epilepsy Care Group Singapore Awareness Association: Survey reveals new safety warnings on antiepileptics not received by pregnant women

Antiepileptic drugs and the potentially harmful effects on unborn children has hit the headlines as a survey reveals many women have not received the new safety warnings about the dangers of taking it during pregnancy.

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In an exclusive story from the BBC, it has been revealed that out of the 475 women under 50 currently taking Epilim (sodium valproate) nearly 70% had not received the new warnings. These new warnings, known as the Valproate Toolkit, were launched in February 2016. Created by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) the aim of the toolkit was to improve patient information about the risks of neuro-developmental disorders in unborn children.

The data extracted from a survey of 2,000 women and girls, commissioned by three charities — Epilepsy Society, Epilepsy Action and Young Epilepsy — also demonstrated that one in six women taking the drug were not aware of the negative affects it may have on the development and/or physical health of an unborn child. In the UK alone about 20,000 children have been affected by antiepileptic medicines (valproate medicines) since the 70s.

A public hearing concerning sodium valproate will take place on 26 September at the EMA’s London offices in Canary Wharf. The survey results will be presented during this hearing, which is the first time the agency’s safety committee has held a public hearing as a part of a safety review of a medicine.

During this session, women will be able to recount their personal experiences of taking the medication to the agency’s safety committee. The hearing will be focus on three main areas: the risks of the medication in pregnancy, the current measures in place to reduce the risks of using valproate in pregnancy and the measures that should be taken to reduce the risks associated with the medication and its use in pregnancy.

The Medicines & Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the UK explained that valproate was constantly reviewed and warnings surrounding the medication were updated as and when new data were made available. “The results of the survey are important in helping us understand the effectiveness of the measures taken to date in the UK. We want to encourage all women to have access to the valproate toolkit materials that we made available in February 2016,” the agency said to the BBC. “We constantly monitor the safe use of valproate and support this latest review by the European Medicines Agency on the use in pregnancy and women of childbearing age.”
Date: 2017.10.17 Category: Health Comments (0) Trackbacks (0)

Dr. Richard Isaacs: Medical Profile

Otolaryngology (ENT) Sacramento, CA
Physician-in-Chief / Director, The Permanente Medical Group, Board of Directors, Oakland, CA

SUMMARY

Professional Background
“I joined Kaiser Permanente in 1995 and have Advanced Certification in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery. My specialties include: orbital, nasal, and maxillofacial surgery, as well as thyroid and parathyroid surgery. I function as a regional resource for the management of advanced tumors of the head and neck and provide the otolaryngologic approach for tumors at the skull base. Additionally, I am trained in Facial Plastic and Reconstructive surgery and perform rhinoplasty, blepharoplasty, otoplasty, and rhytidectomy. I have an interest in post-tumor facial reconstruction and facial reanimation surgery. I am a Fellow of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and also a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons.

I received my Bachelor of Science degree, with Distinction, from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and my Doctor of Medicine degree, with Honors, from Wayne State University in Detroit. Then, I completed my Otolaryngology training in New York at the Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital / New York Hospital-Cornell Medical College. Subsequently, I received additional Head and Neck Oncologic and Skull Base Surgical training from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and The University of California, Davis. I am also a 2004 graduate of the Kenan-Flagler School of Business Advanced Leadership Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and the University of California, San Francisco, CHCF Advanced Leadership Program. “

Roles
“In April of 2005, I was appointed to the Physician-In-Chief and Chief-of-Staff positions for the South Sacramento and Elk Grove Medical Facilities. I am very fortunate to be able to continue my head and neck surgical practice and I greatly enjoy my administrative position as well. I provide leadership to our 450 physicians/providers and more than 2000 nurses and staff who care for the 200,000 Kaiser Permanente members in the South Sacramento/Elk Grove area.”

CLINICAL SPECIALTIES & INTERESTS

Otolaryngology (ENT): General Otolaryngology/ENT, Head & Neck Microvascular Surgery, Head & Neck Oncologic Surgery

EDUCATION & TRAINING
* University of California Davis
* Cornell University Medical College
* Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
* St Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center
* Wayne State University School of Medicine

CERTIFICATIONS & LICENSURE
* CA State Medical License
1992 – 2016
* American Board of Otolaryngology
Otolaryngology

AWARDS, HONORS, & RECOGNITION
* Fellow (FAAO-HNS)
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
* Presidents Award for Scientific Exhibit: "Skull Base Surgical Approaches to Distal Carotid Aneurisms."
American Academy of Otolaryngology
* Top MD
Consumers Checkbook


 
Date: 2016.01.21 Category: Health Comments (0) Trackbacks (0)

Experts close to perfect in determining truth in interrogations using active question methods

From the International Communication Association media release:

Determining deception is a tool of the trade for law enforcement.

The Good Cop/Bad Cop routine is etched in our minds as an effective method of finding out the truth. But prior research has shown that lie detecting is a 50/50 shot for experts and non-experts alike. So what exactly can we do to find out the truth?

A recent study published in Human Communication Research by researchers at Korea University, Michigan State University, and Texas State University, San Marcos found that using active questioning of individuals yielded near-perfect results, 97.8%, in detecting deception.

Timothy Levine, Hee Sun Park (University of Korea), David Daniel Clare, Steve McCornack, Kelly Morrison (Michigan State University), and J.Pete Blair (Texas State, San Marcos) published their findings in the journal Human Communication Research. The researchers conducted three studies based on sets of participants who were asked to play a trivia game. Unbeknownst to the participants, a confederate was placed with them offering an incentive and opportunity to cheat at the game, since cash prizes were involved. In the first experiment 12% of the subjects cheated; in the second experiment 44.9% cheated.

An expert using the Reid Technique interrogated participants in the first study, this expert was 100% accurate (33 of 33) in determining who had cheated and who had not. That kind of accuracy has 100 million to one odds. The second group of participants were then interviewed by five US federal agents with substantial polygraph and interrogation expertise. Using a more flexible and free approach (interviews lasted from three minutes to 17 minutes), these experts were able to accurately detect whether or not a participant cheated in 87 of 89 interviews (97.8%). In the third study, non-experts were shown taped interrogations of the experts from the previous two experiments. These non-experts were able to determine deception at a greater-than-chance rate – 79.1% (experiment 1), and 93.6% (experiment 2).

Previous studies with "experts" usually used passive deception detection where they watched videotapes. In the few studies where experts were allowed to question potential liars, either they had to follow questions scripted by researchers (this study had no scripts) or confession seeking was precluded. Previous studies found that accuracy was near chance -- just above 50%.

"This research suggests that effective questioning is critical to deception detection," Levine said. "Asking bad questions can actually make people worse than chance at lie detection, and you can make honest people appear guilty. But, fairly minor changes in the questions can really improve accuracy, even in brief interviews. This has huge implications for intelligence and law enforcement."

Levine's findings have led him to develop a new theory, Truth Default Theory. Levine's idea is that when humans communicate with other humans, they tend to operate on a default presumption that what the other person says is basically honest.

"The presumption of honesty is highly adaptive. It enables efficient communication, and this presumption of honesty makes sense because most communication is honest most of the time. However, the presumption of honesty makes humans vulnerable to occasional deceit" Levine said. "There are, of course, times and situations when people abandon this presumption of honesty, and the theory describes when people are expected to suspect a lie or conclude that a lies was told, and the conditions under which people make truth and lie judgments correctly and incorrectly."

"Expertise in Deception Detection Involves Actively Prompting Diagnostic Information Rather Than Passive Behavioral Observation," by Timothy Roland Levine, David Daniel Clare, J. Pete Blair, Steve McCornack, Kelly Morrison and Hee Sun Park; Human Communication Research


Date: 2014.09.09 Category: Health Comments (0) Trackbacks (0)